about the Course

It was one of the shortest periods in music history—70 years or so—but its legacy was profound and permanent. You could even say that the Viennese Classical never really ended. Today's popular music exhibits the structures, harmonies, and forms of Classicism, while concert composers continue to write sonatas, concertos, symphonies, and string quartets—Viennese Classical genres all.

It was the time of giants—Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven. It was also the era of many more worthy artists—Gluck, Clementi, Vanhal, Stamitz—masters all, well worth exploring.

The Viennese Classical gave birth to the symphony, the modern orchestra, chamber music, and art song. Classical composers cast off the gods, myths, and historical pageantry of Baroque opera and instead plumbed the depths of the human heart. Over eight weeks we'll be reveling in the radiance that is Viennese Classicism: the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolution, and the Napoleonic Era all expressed in exquisitely balance, nuanced, and sometimes even disturbing, music.

Thursdays, 10:00 - 11:30 AM.

Xavier Auditorium and overflow rooms

Alfred & Hanna Fromm Hall, 2130 Fulton Street, San Francisco.

The Classical Style
Spring 2015

 

Course Outline

 

  • Week 1 - The Classical Style Arises

    Lecture Slides (PDF)
  • Week 2- Joseph Haydn, Exemplar of the Enlightenment

    Lecture Slides (PDF)
  • Week 3 - Wolfgang Mozart, Heir Apparent

    Lecture Slides (PDF)
  • Week 4 - Some Bright but Lesser Lights

    Lecture Slides (PDF)
  • Week 5 - Symphony

    Lecture Slides (PDF)
  • Week 6 - Opera

    Lecture Slides (PDF)
  • Week 7 - Chamber and Solo Music

    Lecture Slides (PDF)

  • Week 8 - Choral Music

    Lecture Slides (PDF)